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Architectural Modelmaking
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Purchase this book online here

Dunn has set out to produce the ant’s pants of architectural modelmaking books – and how he delivers. Incredibly informative and detailed, it is a design book that you’ll actually read rather than just browse the cool pictures. As a paperback with matt pages, the non-coffee table book feel is intentional.    You are supposed to use this as a resource. Refreshingly, he begins the book with an explanation of why architectural models are made in the first place which is so important when presenting ideas for students.  He then makes a survey of the full range of architectural model types and has categorised them in two helpful ways.  Firstly according to material (card, metal, plastics etc..). This is helpful for knowing how to make models, and step by step processes are clearly described. Some of these process can be transferred to the classroom. 

Secondly models are categorised according to application, that is, how they are used and thank goodness for this because there are a range of reasons that models are made and this comes through in the type of model that is appropriate.  This is where teachers can find the license to allow students to make explorative models which are completely appropriate in the right stage of the design process.Peppered throughout the book are case studies and step by step explanations, but on every page is something inspirational.  Plenty of great pictures to turn into a power point presentation for your class.  It seems that one of the messages of the book is that architectural models can be made from just about anything and the sophistication comes from how you use them to help you in the design process.  The reality is that expecting younger students to produce what might look like ‘high quality’ models is unrealistic.  The solution is to look at the kind of model you are expecting, and by this I mean both the materials used and the application of the model.

Top model-making techniques for ideas and presentation.

By Nick Dunn - 192 pages - 2010 - Laurence King Publishing Limited - London

Purchase this book online here

Dunn has set out to produce the ant’s pants of architectural modelmaking books – and how he delivers. Incredibly informative and detailed, it is a design book that you’ll actually read rather than just browse the cool pictures. As a paperback with matt pages, the non-coffee table book feel is intentional.    You are supposed to use this as a resource. Refreshingly, he begins the book with an explanation of why architectural models are made in the first place which is so important when presenting ideas for students.  He then makes a survey of the full range of architectural model types and has categorised them in two helpful ways.  Firstly according to material (card, metal, plastics etc..). This is helpful for knowing how to make models, and step by step processes are clearly described. Some of these process can be transferred to the classroom. 

Secondly models are categorised according to application, that is, how they are used and thank goodness for this because there are a range of reasons that models are made and this comes through in the type of model that is appropriate.  This is where teachers can find the license to allow students to make explorative models which are completely appropriate in the right stage of the design process.Peppered throughout the book are case studies and step by step explanations, but on every page is something inspirational.  Plenty of great pictures to turn into a power point presentation for your class.  It seems that one of the messages of the book is that architectural models can be made from just about anything and the sophistication comes from how you use them to help you in the design process.  The reality is that expecting younger students to produce what might look like ‘high quality’ models is unrealistic.  The solution is to look at the kind of model you are expecting, and by this I mean both the materials used and the application of the model.

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Purchase this book online here

Dunn has set out to produce the ant’s pants of architectural modelmaking books – and how he delivers. Incredibly informative and detailed, it is a design book that you’ll actually read rather than just browse the cool pictures. As a paperback with matt pages, the non-coffee table book feel is intentional.    You are supposed to use this as a resource. Refreshingly, he begins the book with an explanation of why architectural models are made in the first place which is so important when presenting ideas for students.  He then makes a survey of the full range of architectural model types and has categorised them in two helpful ways.  Firstly according to material (card, metal, plastics etc..). This is helpful for knowing how to make models, and step by step processes are clearly described. Some of these process can be transferred to the classroom. 

Secondly models are categorised according to application, that is, how they are used and thank goodness for this because there are a range of reasons that models are made and this comes through in the type of model that is appropriate.  This is where teachers can find the license to allow students to make explorative models which are completely appropriate in the right stage of the design process.Peppered throughout the book are case studies and step by step explanations, but on every page is something inspirational.  Plenty of great pictures to turn into a power point presentation for your class.  It seems that one of the messages of the book is that architectural models can be made from just about anything and the sophistication comes from how you use them to help you in the design process.  The reality is that expecting younger students to produce what might look like ‘high quality’ models is unrealistic.  The solution is to look at the kind of model you are expecting, and by this I mean both the materials used and the application of the model.

Purchase this book online here

Dunn has set out to produce the ant’s pants of architectural modelmaking books – and how he delivers. Incredibly informative and detailed, it is a design book that you’ll actually read rather than just browse the cool pictures. As a paperback with matt pages, the non-coffee table book feel is intentional.    You are supposed to use this as a resource. Refreshingly, he begins the book with an explanation of why architectural models are made in the first place which is so important when presenting ideas for students.  He then makes a survey of the full range of architectural model types and has categorised them in two helpful ways.  Firstly according to material (card, metal, plastics etc..). This is helpful for knowing how to make models, and step by step processes are clearly described. Some of these process can be transferred to the classroom. 

Secondly models are categorised according to application, that is, how they are used and thank goodness for this because there are a range of reasons that models are made and this comes through in the type of model that is appropriate.  This is where teachers can find the license to allow students to make explorative models which are completely appropriate in the right stage of the design process.Peppered throughout the book are case studies and step by step explanations, but on every page is something inspirational.  Plenty of great pictures to turn into a power point presentation for your class.  It seems that one of the messages of the book is that architectural models can be made from just about anything and the sophistication comes from how you use them to help you in the design process.  The reality is that expecting younger students to produce what might look like ‘high quality’ models is unrealistic.  The solution is to look at the kind of model you are expecting, and by this I mean both the materials used and the application of the model.

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